All posts filed under: FNA3030

Artist Talk: Barbara Walker

Research based artist Barbara Walker lead a talk on her work as part of the lecture series at my university a couple of months ago. Walker’s work comments upon the discourses of social, political and visual representations. She lead the talk beginning with earlier works and began to delve deeper into the concepts behind the acclaimed residency Show and Tell. I have always had an admiration for the artist strategies and curational aesthetics of Walker’s work. The discussion of Show and Tell was the most informative and imperative part of this talk for me. She discussed how working in a larger dimension was symbolic to the assessment of power and societal relations. There has been an ever-present discourse around the construction of portraits and the artists relationship to the subject. She therefore spoke of painting unknown models versus known models, and the complexes of constructing the faces alongside conceptual ideologies. Another compelling segment of the talk was a general discussion of her journey to becoming a practising artist. Speaking on how essential time for reflection …

LaterPress- Amsterdam & Rotterdam

  Briefly documenting both cities (as i’ll be returning soon). I plan to evaluate how these spaces have changed with the difference of time. These photographs are a particular assessment of site specificity and audience engagment with art. I plan to use the photographs to channel the method of ‘compare and contrast’. I will later form a documentation book, in conjuction with my photozine . Enjoy the visuals,for now.

Well-loved ‘things’ take time

My current structure is based upon a curriculum, which is measured by time. At present, it’s all I think about. The process becomes constant, cyclical almost. This obsession, I believe, is brought on by a ‘hurried’ ethic. Thoughout education everything becomes systematic and later, routine. We are told to move on from one project to the next far too quick. In the past couple of months I have been trying to let this obsession go, and have opened up to the belief of ‘things’ needing time. Time to grow; to bloom. I planned to release my photozine ‘You are opulence’ in the beginning of the year. However, it wasn’t ready. I’m channelling this approach of everything I assemble having to acquire all of me. Just like love, art and life. These ‘things’ become more fruitful, more loved with time. What’s your experience with the pressure of time?

SYFU Newspaper

My second publication feature (with sorryyoufeeluncomfortable) is out- and has been for quite some time. Myself and Zarina Muhammad have a conversation in connection with our pieces created for the James Baldwin Project in the summer of last year. We also deliberate forms of representation, identity politics and Artist dispositions. You can buy it here!      

Kimathi Donkor Continued…

As part of my universities Artist Lecture Series Kimathi Donkor was invited in to speak of his practice and journey as an Artist from 2004-2013. Having followed Donkor’s work for a number of years, I was curious about the transition of the communication of his practice from Peckham Space in 2013 to Middlesex University in 2015. Nevertheless, I continue to be absorbed in his concepts and his distinctive way of addressing deep-rooted discourses with the apparatus of paint. Being within the lecture theatre and listening to his presentation was remarkably familiar to me. It felt as though I was re-reading a book- and when you do so, it is understood on a deeper level. I now have a richer knowledge on the historical references and the paramount component of ‘appropriation’ appears clearer. I asked Donkor about the challenges of being a painter and spoke of the time, labour and artistic stamina that is imminent within this type of practice. He responded with “The labour is your decision…”. Sometimes something incredibly obvious is staring you in …

Charlie Phillips @ PhotoFusion

It is extremely rare to visit an exhibition and have an overwhelming feeling of affinity to the Artists response. I felt this particular way when visiting Charlie Phillip’s exhibition at PhotoFusion in Brixton. His show named ‘How Great Thou Art’ is a photo-documentation exhibit of Caribbean and African funerals in London over the past 50 Years. Being of Caribbean heritage I was notably interested in how the difference in culture has changed throughout the decades. As soon as I saw the advertisements, it became fundemental for me to visit. How Great Thou Art is classic funeral ballad, that is almost eminent at every Caribbean funeral. The cunning ethos of making this the title of his exhibition was a powerful tool in creating a sense of acknowledgement to the African/Caribbean presence in Britain. With London now being labelled as ‘Gentrification City’ it was dynamic to see exhibitions of this kind happening. Photofusion is situated in an immensely warm environment- contrary to what we might know as the contemporary ‘white space’. As I entered the gallery, I …