Month: January 2015

Kimathi Donkor Continued…

As part of my universities Artist Lecture Series Kimathi Donkor was invited in to speak of his practice and journey as an Artist from 2004-2013. Having followed Donkor’s work for a number of years, I was curious about the transition of the communication of his practice from Peckham Space in 2013 to Middlesex University in 2015. Nevertheless, I continue to be absorbed in his concepts and his distinctive way of addressing deep-rooted discourses with the apparatus of paint. Being within the lecture theatre and listening to his presentation was remarkably familiar to me. It felt as though I was re-reading a book- and when you do so, it is understood on a deeper level. I now have a richer knowledge on the historical references and the paramount component of ‘appropriation’ appears clearer. I asked Donkor about the challenges of being a painter and spoke of the time, labour and artistic stamina that is imminent within this type of practice. He responded with “The labour is your decision…”. Sometimes something incredibly obvious is staring you in …

Charlie Phillips @ PhotoFusion

It is extremely rare to visit an exhibition and have an overwhelming feeling of affinity to the Artists response. I felt this particular way when visiting Charlie Phillip’s exhibition at PhotoFusion in Brixton. His show named ‘How Great Thou Art’ is a photo-documentation exhibit of Caribbean and African funerals in London over the past 50 Years. Being of Caribbean heritage I was notably interested in how the difference in culture has changed throughout the decades. As soon as I saw the advertisements, it became fundemental for me to visit. How Great Thou Art is classic funeral ballad, that is almost eminent at every Caribbean funeral. The cunning ethos of making this the title of his exhibition was a powerful tool in creating a sense of acknowledgement to the African/Caribbean presence in Britain. With London now being labelled as ‘Gentrification City’ it was dynamic to see exhibitions of this kind happening. Photofusion is situated in an immensely warm environment- contrary to what we might know as the contemporary ‘white space’. As I entered the gallery, I …